Training

Formations

HOW TO GET YOURSELF READY TO FACE A THREAT

All our workshops – rigorously crafted to the client’s discretion – are taught by seasoned experts skilled in all safety/security techniques. You will learn crucial preventive measures to secure your professional and/or personal environment safety, in case of a conflict or threat.

Our approach, both tangible and didactic, encourages a civic-minded behavior as well as mutual solidarity. It is designed for everyone to become aware that while being attentive to our own, we can also contribute to other people’s safety.

Our classes and workshops focus mainly on prevention, by learning the conducts to adopt in case of a threat.

These workshops are intended for any individual, company and public service. They’re divided in three distinct units that can also be interactive:

Ecole

TRAINING FOR SCHOOLS

Bureau

TRAINING FOR PRIVATE COMPANIES AND GENERAL PUBLIC

Profiling

PROFILING TRAINING

A FEW SIMPLE ADVICES TO TRAIN YOUR REFLEXES:

STAY VIGILANT – BE ATTENTIVE

I see an unattended bag, I ask around and try to find its owner. If the owner doesn’t come forward, I step away from the item. I warn people around me and keep them away from the suspicious item. I widen the safety zone to a 350-feet radius and don’t use my cellphone within that radius (some mechanisms can be triggered by radio waves), and I call the police.

LOOK FOR EMERGENCY EXITS

Wherever I find myself, I automatically locate the emergency exits. If I’m in a grocery store, I start by locating the delivery access (usually found near the fresh food section). In a restaurant, I will instead head towards the kitchen or the bathrooms.

IN THE EVENT OF AN EXPLOSION

I immediately lay down on the ground to avoid being exposed to the blast as much as possible. Between the detonation and the blast (and the potential projectiles lodged in them), I have 2 seconds. I plug my ears to protect my eardrums and I slightly open my mouth in order to reduce excessive pressure in my lungs. I wait for law enforcement before evacuating, the zone must be secured. Second explosions can happen during evacuations. The attacks in Zaventem (Brussels airport) and in Istanbul – to name a few – are the proof of it, unfortunately. I don’t go home until I’ve been seen by a doctor at the site or at the hospital (the shock waves of the blast can get triggered later on and create a trauma or internal bleeding).

IN THE EVENT OF A SHOOTING

I immediately lay down on the ground to limit my body surface. Shooters usually aim at chest level for a higher victim count. If possible, I crawl to take cover. If I’m in a building, I avoid getting close to the windows; a stray bullet or an exploding window can be lethal. I call the police.

IN THE EVENT OF A CHEMICAL ATTACK

I move to higher ground if possible – gases are heavier than air, moving close to the ground. I don’t switch on/off any lights, as a spark could cause an explosion. If I’m in the street, I look for the wind direction and I take shelter in a less windy street.

IN THE EVENT OF A STATE OF PANIC

I avoid stampedes, I avoid the middle of the crowd (tripping could get me stamped over), I move away to the sides and run away through smaller streets.

WHEN FACING DANGER

I move little by little. If I’m in a closed space, I move from room to room; if I’m outside, from car to car (by placing myself behind the front tire, so as to be protected by the engine and the rim).